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CSPAN
Sep 19, 2012 11:00pm EDT
desperately needb help because they are coming and back from iraq and afghanistan and they can't find work. and and so we come out of the recession and the recovery way a higher percent of unemployment and especially veterans under age 24 have an even higher percentage of unemployed, and so what we have here is a piece of legislation to give an unemployment cushion for veterans for at least a year until they can find employment in the private sector, and this is employment to do things that we need since so many of our national resources such as parks, such as emergency responders, such as firefighters, such as police need help. look at all the unfunded things that are deteriorating in the national parks. this would be an opportunity to employ those veterans and employ them up to a year. everybody knows that this makes common sense and it's the right thing to do, and what's happening is the folks on that side of the aisle because we are in an election and because this happened to be a proposal coming out of the white house and is brought to the floor by this senator from florida, they
CSPAN
Sep 19, 2012 8:00pm EDT
foreign service officer nominated by president obama to be our ambassador to iraq. and i think all of us on the committee are pleased the president has nominated somebody of high caliber, great experience, who is our defense server vanessa the deputy chief of mission in baghdad for the year and previously served as ambassador to jordan and executive assistant to secretary of state, colin powell and condoleezza rice. while america's war has ended in iraq, the struggle for iraq's future obviously has not ended. the violence is down, but al qaeda and iraq remains a very deadly foe and iraq may not capture the jays today headlined. then no one should make the mistake to somehow come to a conclusion that iraq doesn't present extraordinary challenges. this administration has worked tirelessly to ensure that it doesn't become a forgotten front. we put in place a road mac on a browser to have issues. political, economic, educational, scientific and military. our bilateral partnership has potential to contribute, we believe to the stability in the middle east. but iraqi leaders have to decide
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 5:15pm EDT
thought it was an apt quote. >> host: how many women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans? >> guest: yeah. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically. more women served, were wounded, and killed in the iraq war by around 2005 into the war already than all the wars all poult to the. one in ten troops was a woman. >> host: because of the nature of the war -- >> guest: basically a guerrilla war, there's not any front line. drawing a line in the sand, and the enemy side should meet up and fight. that doesn't happen anymore. battles take place, end roads, hospitals, and even if you drive a truck full of toilet paper you can be attacked. because there's no front line, even if you're combat support or you're an engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle, and many, many women also were used as gunners working alongside with the infantry doing the same jobs as the infantry because of the shortage of troops. >> host: women are not supposed to serve in combat, are they? >>
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 10:00pm EDT
invest 800 but with the nephew have real capital. . . and that's iraq. it was a very contentious issue and do spend a lot of time writing about it in the book and you reiterate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it if 9/11 change the world the consequences that the iraq war were similarly dramatic magnitude. why did you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war led to major divisions within the international communities and i'm not just talking about the u.n.. i'm talking about its impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond and a sense that the world has been broken into groups and some were being targeted or profiled who felt very strongly about this and this is about a bar on which the international committee was divided. the council did not approve it and i firmly believe we should have given the inspectors, the weapons inspectors, more time to do their work in iraq and gotten back with a report to the security council but the council that heads wanted so dam -- saddam said there would be serious consequences to determine f
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
persian gulf. we will hear about the challenges iraq faces after the country has yet to finalize a law dictating the use of oil profits. tension continues to rise over the oil rights in the government of baghdad and the kurdish region. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you for the policy event of the fall semester and i would just mention in the way that advertisement we will be having our next program on october 23rd and we will get a notice but it will be on jordan. i think i put a title belt there in the crosshairs and we are very fortunate to have dr. washer who is the vice president for studies of the carnegie endowment for the national peace, for our foreign minister of jordan and a free good personal friend who will be coming as well as dr. kurt ryan who is this a sea of political science at appalachian state university and a scholar and person who's written a lot about jordan. so that should be very interesting forum. but tonight, as we gather i always express my appreciation to the exxonmobil corporation which is a founder and a dillinger and gives us a substantial co
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 12:00pm EDT
most famous intervention of your time as secretary general. it was iraq. it was a contentious issue. you spend a lot of time writing about this in the book and you reintegrate your thoughts that it was not a legitimate war. you write, it's 9/11 changed the world, the consequences of the iraq war were the similarly dramatic magnitude. why do you say that >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really left with the international community and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east. and beyond. and the sense that the world has been broken in to groups and some were being targeted or profiles who felt very strongly about this, and this is about a war on which they the international community was divided. not approve it and i've personally believed we should have give the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back with a report to the security counsel but the counsel had that won saddam hussein, that if you do not [inaudible] there would be serious consequences to determine th
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 9:00pm EDT
was not a legitimate war. that 9/11 changed the world from the consequences of the iraq war were similarly dramatic in magnitude. when you say that? >> guest: the iraq war rarely mentioned interaction with the community. i'm not just talking about the u.n. communities and groups in the middle east. and also beyond. the things that the world has been broken into groups, or some are being targeted or profiled, felt very who felt very strongly about this. this is about more on which the committee was divided. the council did not approve it. some believe we should been giving the inspectors the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iraq and come back to the council, that if you do not perform, there would be serious consequences. to determine what those consequences should be. obviously, when it comes to use of force, any country one attack has a right to defend itself. but when it comes to broader peace and security issues, one cannot do it without the unique legitimacy of the figurative narration. >> host: is not a war that is still interested, although it is extreme ter
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 7:00pm EDT
it was a very apt quote. >> how many women served in the iraq war? >> about 200,000 -- over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. >> americans. >> is that unusual? >> yes. the iraq war in particular set a precedent. more women have served and been wounded and killed in the iraq war by about 2005 to get into the war already. all americans for together since world war ii, including afghanistan. so it was a huge, huge difference. one in every 10 troops was women. >> did they serve different capacities in the past quite >> yes, because of the nature of the war, the nature of all boys these days, there isn't any front-line narrow fashion sense, drawing a line in the sand for having an area where the soldiers from the enemy said the meet up in sight. that just doesn't happen anymore. battles take place in roads and hospitals would even if you're driving on the chart with toilet paper, you can be attacked. so because there's no front line, even if you're a combat engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle and many, many women also been used working alongside indian country doing e
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 6:30pm EDT
geography got its revenge in the mountains and deserts of iraq and afghanistan. because a transformative moment for me, was imbedded with the first battalion of the fifth marines, in kuwait in march 2004, and we were making an overland journey of several hundred miles to fallujah, and fallujah was not yet in the news. the battle was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah, and all we did was transport one marine battalion from one place to another. no fighting in between. wasn't particularly dangerous. but the logistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water bottles. a tool kit. meals ready to eat. it was just an immense logistical exercise to get men and women and materiale from northern kuwait to fallujah without any fighting, and there you saw how distance mattered. how you just couldn't defeat distance through the latest technology. >> i think it might be interesting for the audience if you'd personalize the story of iraq a little bit, and talk about your own views. this is a place you knew, that you traveled in, in the 1980s and the time of saddam hussein
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 12:45pm EDT
" tonight at 10 p.m. >> brian castner, a bronze star recipient who completed two tours of duty in iraq as a commander of an explosive disposal unit, talks about the impact of the war upon his return. this is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thanks to everybody for coming. um, this is quite a crowd. we've got standing room only, and that's a wonderful thing. just want to take a second to acknowledge my wife is here, jesse, i dedicated the book to her, and my folks are here, and lots of friendly faces in the audience from various communities in buffalo, so i appreciate that. thank you all for coming. what i'd hoped to do was talk a little bit, first, about the book, then do a reading, a short reading. i, i recorded the audio book. i was lucky enough to do that. so if you really want to hear my voice do the whole thing, you can do that. so i'll do kind of a short section, and then we'll do some question and answer at the end, if that works. where i wanted to start was talking about a trip that i made in may. the first weekend in may every year is the eod memorial down in florida. and
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00am EDT
: company women served in the iraq war? >> guest: over 200,000 served in iraq and afghanistan. americans. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: yes, the iraq war in particular. more women had served in the iraq war by around 2005, two years into the war already, then all the american wars put together, including afghanistan. one in every 10 troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: they serve in different capacities and in the past? >> guest: yes, because it was a guerrilla war, drawing a line in the sand, having an errol where they are our soldiers from enemy side, that is a battle that takes place in roads and hospitals and trucks and toilet paper, it they are used for attacks. it because there is no front line, even if you are an engineer or a cook, many women were being used as gunners and doing the same jobs because of the shortage of troops. >> host: but women are not supposed to serve in combat, right? >> guest: yes, that's right. on the ground, in reality, when you have combat in iraq afghanistan for two years. >> host: was very typical experience for american soldiers? >> it's hard to
CSPAN
Sep 10, 2012 12:00am EDT
booktv.org. .. your thoughts it was not a legitimate war. you say if 9/11 change the world, the iraq war is similar magnitude. why do you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really led to major divisions within the international community, and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond the, and the sense the world has been broken into groups, and some are being targeted or profiled, who felt very strongly about it, and this is about a war on which the international community was divided. -- it was not approved, and personally believed we should have given the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iran and come back with a report to the security council, for the council that warned saddam, if you do not perform there will be serious consequences, to determine, firstly, whether he has performed cooperatively with inspectors or not and secondly, determined what those consequences should be. obviously when it comes to use of force, any country, when attacked, has the right to defend itsel
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 7:30pm EDT
striking scene in the iraq war. i had to find out more about the story and as i interviewed scores of american and iraqi colleagues they came to realize that perhaps his story is critical to understanding america's role of the world stage in the post-bin laden, post arab spring area and maybe even to discover more about what it truly means to be an american. the historical impact of what travis and patrick did as a colleague was rather -- patrick and was a key in the iraq war. infect the war began to turn around in mid-2006, once before the famous surge started happening as patriquin and his military and intelligence colleagues helped iraqis launch something called the awakening which was a sunni tribal revolt against al qaeda. al qaeda of course had never really conquered and held a large piece of territory in the world. there were some exceptions, but what happened in anbar province was al qaeda basically conquered the province and they set up a parallel government, sharia law, courts, a parallel ministry even of government and the rule of this version of radical, radical islam or a
CSPAN
Sep 24, 2012 11:00pm EDT
instability in lebanon and iraq on their borders. and so, that was the mandate. that was legitimacy for the asides to rule. they lost that because of the policy and bashar al-assad unleashing the dogs in terms of cracking down the opposition. his policy in instability and insecurity. so he no longer has legitimacy. in a broader sense he is solid. whether he stays in power, he'll never have the mandate to rule again and legitimacy he once enjoyed. >> host: are western policymakers assuming his fall is inevitable? and should they? >> guest: that's interesting. i've been contacted by media outlets wanting a quarter to an obituary for about a year now. every time the call, i say it's premature because the regime has the wherewithal and maybe more importantly the willingness to stay in power and do what it takes to stay in power. so i think the united states and the west and others opposed to the assad regime have backed up these predictions of imminent demise. every time there is a prominent affection, everyone says the opposition is dazed and falling and so forth here that hasn't happe
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 9:00am EDT
talking about the iraq war that became a substitute for i think true patriotism which is speaking out on issues that are of importance to our national security. those are his exact words. yesterday said they. it kept getting worse. the pain he said he didn't like he actually used to like about a foot in america started liking it and so he stopped liking it. in that interview he actually refer to the american flag lapel pin as -- >> i won't wear that pin on my chest instead of going to try to tell the american people what i believe will make this country great. and hopefully that will be a testimony for my patriotism. >> you heard it right. you heard it right. he called it that 10. a little white bill clinton referred to that woman, remember? but not to fear. and not to were the president obama came around. that pain he stopped when because it didn't really show what was in his heart, he is now wearing near his heart today just about every day. it's one of those cheesy things you just have to do as president i guess. when he returns to civilian life, soon i hope rather than later -- [a
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
kaizen rams. i wrote it back in march 2010, well before military was out of iraq and just after the supreme court issues citizens united decision, but before was utterly clear that the floodgates had been open so wide that we might be called the politics of the rich in america would soon become simply american politics. i called it, being a critic, all the world's a stage for s. in march 2010, i wrote about a group of pundits and more internalized, eager not to see the us military leave iraq. that appeared on the op-ed page of "the los angeles times" and the longer version and then began pondering the media world. one of its stopped curiously enough with the military newspaper, stars & stripes. from a military man can miss e-mailed response, rager article in stars & stripes beard was the last time you visited iraq? a critique and 15 well-chosen words, so much more effective than the one angry e-mails i get. his point is interesting. at least it interested me. after less than wrote back in the senate 65 who had never been anywhere near him back in and and undoubtedly never would be.
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 7:00am EDT
not only destabilizes syria but destabilizes lebanon, iraq, jordan and potentially turkey. the opportunity is to move with countries in the region like turkey and jordan and others in iraq who are waiting for u.s. leadership, and to bring an end to that regime sooner because we have seen the longer it goes the more people die, the more sectarian it is. the more it upsets the neighborhood. in destabilizing the neighbor the question is how to do it. we can talk about it. i think the way you do it is to empower those people who are fighting for their future and give them the weapons so that they can topple the regime themselves. but the mindsets that any president needs to have is this is not just a single crisis management situation. we handled tunisia, libya, egypt and syria. this runs the risk of a meltdown in the middle east. it is a strategic challenge but also a strategic opportunity to try to further emphasize and establish yet another example where sunni and shiite and other minorities are working together to define a common future which is what the middle east needs becau
CSPAN
Sep 16, 2012 10:00pm EDT
. "right after 9/11 i haven't been particularly because talking about the iraq war was a substitute for true patriotism speaking out to national security. ". it kept getting worse. the pin he used to like and don't everybody started to like it then he did not like it. he referred to the american replied lapel pin s "that been" listed alto the people what will make the country great and that is a testimony to my patriotism. you heard it right. he called it "that pin" lipo clinton referred to that woman. [laughter] not to fear preparatory. obamacare year-round. he is now wearing it near his heart today every day. the cheesy thing you have to do as president. when he returns to civilian life, hopefully sooner than later. [applause] i suspect he will like to ditch that annoying little 10. he could replace it with united nations flag pins. no bigger than a nickel drives liberals bonkers. here is a guy like me that seems nice i am not foaming at the mouth just my new mail business that i am grateful to live in the united states of america. gratitude of the sacrifices. gratitude to the opportu
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2012 7:00pm EDT
sophisticated attack on one of the most heavily fortified installations in iraq. it was professional. it was carried out in a professional fashion. it resulted in $200 million worth of loss to the american taxpayer. the greatest single act of destruction since the tet offense back during the vietnam war. in iraq -- in afghanistan, because of the attacks of afghan soldiers on american soldiers, we've had to suspend the operations between the military and police, between the two countries. if there is ever an indicator of failure of our policy in afghanistan, it is our now inability to even train with them to be ready to take over our -- the responsibilities that we now hold. there is no greater indication of the failure of the president of the united states to continue to tell not that we need -- the american people and the people of the world not that we need to succeed, not that we need to win, but that we need to withdraw. and so countries in the region have taken the lesson and have, are making accommodations. the fact is that we are now facing a collapse national sec
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 8:45pm EDT
out of iraq for us. turns out largely what patriquin wanted it to because he proved to be very effective in fighting al qaeda and try to begin to flip from pro-al qaeda to the coalition side. in my book there are few scenes of patriquin in action. one of them was patriquin first met him. he shows up with a mustache and he speaks arabic slang, iraqi arabic and his first meeting face-to-face at what part of iraq are you from, the north or the south? patriquin as he often did would say something like no i'm from chicago. i am an american and many iraqis were befuddled by that because he thought he might've been an iraqi left as a child and done over and came back with a funny western accident. they met and quickly became very close allies through this struggle. >> you can watch this and other programs on line of booktv.org. >> you dinesh d'sousa presents his thoughts on what a second term for the obama administration would look like. the author contends that the president's policies would greatly reduce america's global force. it's about one hour, 10. [applause] >> thank you. plea
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2012 12:00pm EDT
dofnlt i hope we can confirm our ambassadors to iraq and afghanistan, and the continuing resolution to fund the government for six months. republicans say this congress has been unproductive. but if republicans want to know why it's been unproductive, they should take a look in the mirror. benjamin franklin once said, "well-done is better than well-said." close quote. "well-done is better and well-said." so it is time republicans stopped talking about how much they wanted to get things done and started working with us to actually get things done. the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: yesterday dozens of republican senators came to the senate floor one after the other to register their complete frustration with the way democrats are running this place. never before -- never -- have a president and a majority party in the senate done so little to address challenges as great as the ones our nation faces right now. never. i mean, we've got a $16 trillion debt, and they haven't bothered to put together a budget in three years. they haven't passed a single appropriatio
CSPAN
Sep 2, 2012 12:00am EDT
2001 when i was not on tech and two in iraq, one in pelot and one in kirkuk. came back and move to buffalo in 2007 i thought everything was fine and i got a job and everything was fine for a couple of years until one day when it wasn't find any more. i guess that is what i wrote the book about which was the struggle to figure out what was wrong when i got home and the things i did over there. something was happening to me physically that i didn't understand. i had a physical reaction. i didn't feel worried or stressed and i wasn't having nightmares and i wasn't jumping a car doors and i wasn't doing all the stereotypical things that they tell you is what ptsd is going to look like or any of those coming home issues are going to be like. i had a physical feeling in my chest that i had no name for so i went to the emergency room for a heart attack. and i went back a couple of times. it was never a heart attack and they hooked me up to all the monitors and an ekg and everything else and no, there's nothing physically wrong with you. so then i got referred, i guess the system worked a
CSPAN
Sep 3, 2012 8:30am EDT
, what we're doing as far as wars in this afghanistan and iraq. the main book i read was hard measures by jose rodriguez. he was, basically, head of the team that put together the interrogation methods after september 11th including waterboarding which has been criticized but which i think was effective and did the job. a very, very well-written book. also the art of intelligence by hank compton. he's with cia, but he was orchestrating, managing, directing the war in afghanistan after 9/11. and, again, a fascinating read. kill or capture by daniel klandman, this follows the obama administration as far as what they're doing in iraq and afghanistan, how their policies are being pursued and shows a side of the president which indicates that his policies are not that different in many cases from president bush's. also peter bergin's book, the hunt for bin laden, which i'm really just starting now. it details the ten-year manhunt for bin laden which, of course, ended very successfully last may when he was killed. and then dr. johnson who's been a witness before on my committee has a book ca
CSPAN
Sep 12, 2012 9:00am EDT
management officer. he had served in iraq. he's a father, a father of two children, a devoted husband. we now know what happened to them. so we must continue our strong partnership with libya after the fall of qadhafi. but i call upon the new leadership, call for calm, call for tolerance, call for you're angry. there are ways to do protests and so on. you don't have to go around killing the american ambassador when our air people, our air force flew over libya and our president and our congress work to support this new government coming up. and then there's cairo. because of anger over a video -- and i don't know about this video. i don't know its content. but i do know the outcome, that our embassy in cairo was stormed. they tore down our american flag, they replaced it with another flag. but we are under the flag of the united states of america and our flag is in egypt, our flag is in egypt because we are great allies to the egyptian government and great supporters of the egyptian people as they come through the arab spring and again trying to create a new day and a new way. i say to am
CSPAN
Sep 26, 2012 11:00pm EDT
obama who have taken us out of iraq. president obama who has waged a tough war against al qaeda and has gone off the leadership note tbli osama bin laden who has taken out from the terrorist on yemen -- and president obama because of the actions in the very pressive record has boosted american credibility in some parts of the world. governor romney has been trying to assert that president obama is not strong enough on foreign policy. he hasn't supported israel enough. or not as tough as he should be with china. i'm not sure that's getting through. i wonder if romney might be better adviced to articulate in a more detailed way how he would change american and foreign and security policy and how do we deal with china, russia, get out of afghanistan with i have 68,000 men and tbhim uniform in afghanistan. the debate start as you know next week, it looks like foreign policy will be a part part of the debate in the campaign. i think it's healthy we discuss the issues. >> host: i want your comments from out there from the viewers. for nicholas burns who is up in boston. he's teaching a ha
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2012 9:00am EDT
places that are important to american interests; lebanon, kuwait, syria, pakistan and iraq. i finally met him in person, actually, before he was going to pakistan, and we spent a half day briefing him. and everything that happened in that half day his wit, his security, his perception, his intelligence, everything comported to that description that bob blackwell had used several years ago when he first described ryan crocker to me. ryan finished in the last years of the bush administration as our ambassador to iraq, presided over the transition that was extraordinarily complex and difficult and retired from the foreign service with the highest title of career ambassador. came back to texas and worked as the dean of the bush school. and i think at that point he was looking forward to a real transition and a life that would be his own. but fortunately for the united states, i'm not sure i'll say fortunately for him, the president called again. and in very difficult moments, president obama asked him to come back to national service which, being the patriot that he is, he did. he left th
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 3:45pm EDT
first question. before iran, let's speak iraq. in the early '80s, the prime minister decided to attack the nuclear reactor in iraq. it wasn't popular here in the u.s., but we did it. and we we were condemned by the u.s., by the state department, we were condemned by the u.n., but years later people exearkted that the -- appreciated that the, grave decision that prime minister begin took in 198 is 1 was for the benefit of the american people. because when you, the american army, invaded iraq, you were able do into the region without taking the risk that iran was nuclear. i'm sure there are some young jewish people in the audience, and for us, i don't mean -- yom kippur is the holiest day of the year. 1973 during the yom kippur, that's something i found out even though i thought i knew everything before i wrote the book, but while doing the research, i learned myself a lot, and i found out that in 1973 when the egyptian and syrian armies caught us by surprise and we were almost in a point that we would have lost the war, and when we lose the war, you know where we can go to, to the sea.
CSPAN
Sep 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
interest to have a good relationship with iraq. they should not limited because -- [inaudible] or the muslim brotherhood. this is a great mistake. the other thing that is taking place, which again feeds in to the sense of frugs frustration and marginalization that many of the young men exhibit is you don't have the leadership in the other world. you have to look at the becames of states in the middle east, what do you see? you see today it marginalize it began -- [inaudible] okay. and egypt a country of 7,000 years 75 million people was the [inaudible] inned medieval times. egypt today has a great power could not influence events in gaza. they cannot control it. that is really numbing on the egyptian. it [inaudible] egypt today cannot compete with turkey, it cannot compete with iran, egypt today because egypt believes it is leave in the shadow of the powerful israeli states. [inaudible] so there is a leadership in the arab world. states like egypt, syria, iraq, have been marginalized for hundreds of years. the decision making process is very slow in libya. they have a leadership there
CSPAN
Sep 23, 2012 12:00pm EDT
women served in the iraq war. >> guest: over 200,000 have served in iraq and afghanistan. >> host: americans. >> guest: yes, americans. >> host: is that unusual? >> guest: ey, the iraq war in particular set a precedent historically, more women served and have been wounded and killed in the iraq war by iran's 2005 into the war already, than all the american wars put together since world war ii, including afghanistan. so, it was a huge difference. one in every ten troops in iraq was a woman. >> host: did they serve in different capacities than hey served in the past? >> guest: yes, bought because of the nature of the war is a guerrilla war, there isn't any front line. having an area where soldiers from the enemy side will meet up and fight. that doesn't happen anymore. battles take place in hospitals, even if you're driving a truck full of toilet paper, you can be attacked. so, because of no frontline, even if you're combat support or an engineer or a cook, you can get drawn into battle, and many, many women also were being used as gunners and working alongside with the infantry, do
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 10:00pm EDT
where 1981 they bombed the iraq reactor in iraq and stopped for a time the iraqi program. they spread the program out and brought in russian scientists in the sciences from scientist from other countries as well and very sophisticated effort. they have adapted for long-term -- to carry atomic devices. they are very determined to become an atomic power and it's important to remember what atomic powers do. they don't detonate atomic vons. they threaten to do so and extract concessions with those threats and when i talk to the american officials in saudi arabia and other nearby air countries they are equally terrified of the israelis. they know what kind of concessions the persians are going to demand and they're not going to be small in ambition. >> host: frightening. let's move onto fast and furious where the inspector general's report, eric holder and the president talked about waiting for word on what actually happened in the fast and furious operation yet you see this as another example of deficiencies in obama's leadership in particular dealing with a subordinate in this case the a
CSPAN
Sep 22, 2012 8:45am EDT
not getting results opposite to what he intends. he intends the result is getting. of iraq applause] >> good afternoon. welcome to michigan. i don't want to put you on the spot but donate $60 to your $1,000 gift -- [applause] >> if you don't want to take it next time you asked for money at it in. conservatives dig in their own pockets to solve problems. liberals look of the government to take care of them. [applause] >> george is doing okay. i will buy tickets to the film and give them too young people who might not otherwise go. [applause] >> if obama is given a second term what types of changes in his administration or his cabinet, what changes do you see happening that will help achieve his goals? >> obama in his personal appointments has to be a little cautious in the first term. partly because he was a new he needed to figure out how to operate and maneuver so he started with some clinton people and he realized pretty soon that the clinton people were trying to block him. they were trying to block him because they are traditional democrats. if you look in bob woodward's book he
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 9:00pm EDT
but first in the early '80s deciding to attack the nuclear reactor in iraq not popular in the u.s. but we did it and we were condemned by the state department and the when years later people appreciated that decision that he took in 1981 was for the benefit of the american people. the american army invades iraq could go win and in 19731 and jewish declared it the holiest day of the year. during the yum! kippur war. i thought i knew everything before the book but i've learned a lot with reset -- research. 1973 with the egyptian and civilian army is caught us by surprise, we almost lost the war. it is not the war the fight yen the it now or afghanistan but it means we are out of the game. we were to the point* first day of the war the state department sent a telegram to the embassy. there was a message from kissinger telling us israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger will move forward. at that time they egyptian and civilian armies were already on the way to destroy the jewish state. the prime minister at the time was afraid to take a preemptive attack
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 2:00pm EDT
. i wrote it back in 2010 for the military was out of iraq. for it was utterly clear the floodgates have been opened so wide that what might be called the politics of the richer america would certainly become american politics. i called it being a critic. all the world is as interested in march of 2010, i wrote about a group of pundits and warrior journalists, eager not to sue u.s. military leave iraq. that appeared on the op-ed page of the "los angeles times" and then began wandering the media world. one of its stops, curiously enough was the military newspaper, stars and stripes. this e-mail respons read your article in stars and stripes. when was the last time you visited iraq? a critique and 15 well-chosen world. his point, i was then a 65-year-old guy who had never been anywhere near iraq and undoubtably never would have. possibly more than once and disagreed with my assessment. this is not to be taken lightly. what, after all, do i know about iraq? only the reporting i've been able to read. the analysis found lots of experts, on the other hand, even from thousands of miles awa
CSPAN
Sep 28, 2012 8:00pm EDT
. specificity this morning, they claim they have captured some military strikes in iraq in an area where in fact they have found chemical weapons, components, capability whatever it may be. so do you know if the rebels have essentially found, you have concerns they have found various chemical weapons capabilities? do you believe that serious chemical weapons have been moved beyond the initial incident of many weeks ago and what concerns are opposed to the equation? does it raise the concern that iranians could also be getting their hands on chemical capabilities there? >> first and foremost, as i have expressed obviously we continue to have the concern about the security of the cbw sites and we continue to monitor that, working with the countries in the region to ensure that we have the best information possible with regards to the sites and how they are being secured. at this stage with regards to the major sites that were looking at, lead we to believe that those sites still remains secured by the syrian military. there has been intelligence that -- there have been some moves that have ta
CSPAN
Sep 8, 2012 4:00pm EDT
money, but there's got to be some kind of balancing with the public good. iraq war, you know, if we don't talk too much about them not fact checking the iraq war and as a result of that. but, you know, speaking the new york times have a mission to provide the public service and for-profit. can you do that? i guess it can be done. i know, i'm going off here on your question. [inaudible] >> what were your trusted news sources for information? >> first thing i did to write this book, i went to the to the peer review literature. and the resource of the peer review literature first is that most people know the peer review process. the peer review process what districts use when you submit research you submit it without your name or institution it goes to a body that fact checks it before it can be published. and once it passes a fact checking and if they really agree in this blind process that you are saying something that is a a contribution and b is not, you know, hogwash then it can be published that's where i started. and there a flaws in every system and there are flaws in the peer
CSPAN
Sep 18, 2012 12:00pm EDT
projectile, efp, that killed so many americans in afghanistan we've ever found evidence of in iraq, sorry, the only one we ever found evidence of in afghanistan was an inert one that we believe was left for us to find as a reminder, say, you know, we're only using one hand and only three fingers on that hand. they're not doing that to say because we're fundamentally nice people and we don't want to hurt anybody. i think it is a signal that they're, you know -- there, you know, still is something, perhaps, to talk about. and i would like to see us explore that if we can. now, i've got to tell you, you know, i have one great quality that i've always brought to the foreign service which is my inherent expend about, you know -- expend about, you know? ship him out. if it works, great, if it doesn't, you know, we didn't lose much. [laughter] so i mean an authority to maintain the iranians. i had it, obviously, going back to '01 through '03. had it again the whole time i was in iraq, did so and retained it in afghanistan. couldn't find any afghan -- or any iranian ready to take me up on it. you
CSPAN
Sep 7, 2012 12:00pm EDT
different book than this. and then after my military experiences and iraq and afghanistan, and as you started seeing the iranian issued a different light i expanded the scope of the book and spent a good ten years researching and writing this. my wife likes to remind me we haven't had a vacation since 2004. so very much every waking moment of my free time. i took a sabbatical from the government service. i was in the washington think tank for an extended period of time which gave me the freedom away from the government to write and travel. the research is quite interesting. if you're familiar with government records and the modern era, they are not in very good shape. most of them are electronic records. a lot of them have not been saved. so it really is -- we are not finding people who still have records talking to people. obviously archives -- and caspar weinberger giving me access to his papers. one of the best sources was a retired admiral i stumbled into who have really detailed presidential and secretary defense level meeting notes in notebooks he had in the crawl space of his b
CSPAN
Sep 15, 2012 10:00am EDT
also used the drones a lot in iraq and afghanistan as part of the larger wars. the u.s. has also used trial and in yemen, somalia. it appears they have used terms in the philippines and in libya as well. now, libya is an interesting case because when there were discussions among the public about the pros and cons of the u.s. intervening in libya, there is one thing that was really left out of the equation and that was whether or not it was a good thing to get involved militarily to overthrow gadhafi. the way in which it was done is to cut congress altogether and the administration's just vacation or not even bringing this up for a discussion in congress is when it's just an air war that we are using drugs and new of u.s. lives are at risk of a congress should have no say and not. so think of the kind of usurpation of power by the executive ranch, taken this away from the legislative ranch and what kind of precedent is set for future people in the white house. we have also been a case of a rat, when the u.s. troops left, left drones behind and put them in the hands not of the military,
CSPAN
Sep 21, 2012 11:00pm EDT
iran and iraq. in that war there were planes on both sides american planes, because we had sold planes to both sides. at the time, iran was still flying many f-4's a couple phantoms and on the other side we had advisors on the ground advising hussein. hussein was our ally and we sent money to hussein on a routine basis. there are some reports that say hussein grect drectly got money from our c.i.a. -- directly got money from our c.i.a. you can understand the confusion over there and you can understand even though iraq has been liberated and there is a democracy there that some of them still seem to hate us for some reason. you wonder why would they hate us if we freed them? because some of them still remember hussein and they fear there will be another hussein. one of the saddest stories that came up i think in the last week was a young soldier was killed in afghanistan. he was killed by the policeman the afghan policeman he was training. we've had over 50 deaths in afghanistan this year from friendly fire from our supposed allies. this one was particularly sad. this boy was to
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2012 12:00pm EDT
battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring. it passed the senate unanimous unanimously. it was passed by the house overwhelmingly. it was sent down, and it was signed into law. and last year we passed a bill granting tax benefits to companies that hire wounded warriors, but we have to do more. so we filed this legislation that the chairman of the committee, senator murray, will further explain, and this legislation is to create a veterans' job corps. it's modeled after the civilian conservation corps of the 1930's. the veterans' job corps would put veterans back to work res
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
of the iraq war by "the new york times" dwight garner. it's just out in paperback. her coverage of the cultural politics of the middle east and the new york times, the "washington post," "saveur," in the nation has been recognized, and included in the best food writing series. welcome, annia. [applause] >> to the left of annia is amanda, the cofounder of food 52.com and author of the essential new times cookbook for which she won an award. a longtime staffer for the new york times, she has authored, edited and contributed to many books including the memory come and cooking for mr. latte. she left the times and 2011 to pursue food 52. welcome, amanda. [applause] >> next we have james oseland. james is editor in chief of "saveur" and was a judge on the first two seasons of bravo's top chef master to his 2006 book on the cuisines and culture of south east asia was recognized by the chains spirit award and the international association of culinary professionals and he has lectured widely. is also an editor at the sassy magazine. i love sassy. [laughter] sassy. >> and next to james is r
CSPAN
Sep 17, 2012 8:30pm EDT
promised to end the war in iraq and we did. [cheers and applause] i said it's time for us to start winding down the war in afghanistan, and we are. we have got a new tower rising above the new york skyline even as al qaeda is on the path to defeat and osama bin laden is dead. [applause] but what happens this past week underscores that we still have threats in the world. we can't just pull that. we have to stay engaged and involved for our security. we have also got to remain vigilant. that is why as long as i'm commander-in-chief we will always have the strongest military the world has ever known. [applause] we will do what is required to keep our personal safe around the world and when our troops come home, when they take off their uniform, we will serve them as well as they have served us. because in america, no one should, no one who has fought for this country should have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads when they come home. [applause] but again here you have got a choice too because my opponent said it was tragic for me to end the war in iraq. he still won't tell
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2012 9:00am EDT
nation, a generation generation who fought in iraq and to still fight in afghanistan. lettuce rededicate our own lives to the cause of giving back to our great nation. four is one of our nations leaders said, the strength of our democracy has always rested on the willingness of those who believe in its values and in their will to serve, to give something back to this country and now it's my privilege to introduce to you the man who spoke those words and who lives them every day, our secretary of defense, leon panetta. [applause] >> mr. president, mrs. obama, general dempsey, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen, and in particular the family members who lost a loved one here on 9/11, 11 years ago on a morning very much like this, terrorists attacked the symbols of american strength, our economy and our commerce, our military might and our democracy. and took the lives of citizens for more than 90 countries. it was the worst terrorist attack on america in our history. today, people gather across the united states, around the world to remember the tragic events of 9/11. some take part
CSPAN
Sep 9, 2012 6:45am EDT
with the phoenix office about this, they shipped him off to iraq, and he is unavailable for comment or to answer any questions by investigators. not to mention president obama's senior adviser for latin america was also getting briefed on program. and so why does this matter to you? why does this matter to young people, why is this a topic you should be interested in? fast and furious is, like i said, a huge scandal. it's a scandal with many scandals in a scandal. whether it's the justice department turning law-abiding gun dealers into criminals to push their own anti-second amendment political agenda, the documentation backs that up, the internal e-mails back that up, whether it's the attorney general changing his story under oath and not being held accountable for this, whether it's the whistleblowers who, like i keep saying, were the only ones who were actually being factual, having their careers destroyed. just today, actually, and this week the new atf director, you know, issued a somewhat minor threat trying to be under the radar, and i don't think he really understands how youtu
CSPAN
Sep 11, 2012 6:00am EDT
would take every opportunity organize an agenda further to the left and without iraq we would come some of the white american electorate so you have votes that are not as well organized as they should've been there's a long discussion why not and i think certainly if there's any conceivable agenda, for example, one of the reasons african-americans switch to the democratic party in the '30s was because roosevelt has a progressive agenda. if the progressive agenda looks more viable and to get over the republican backlog and that's not a partisan statement, just a descriptive statement, then you would get more coalition globalized. if you watch testimony in congress the other day you would seek african-americans taking the lead and testifying in favor of medicare. so once you have a feasible agenda you get somewhere. right now we've been stuck in fighting back. >> my name is cindy brown. i'm a freshman. psychology major and i'm going to backtrack a bit. you mentioned something about substantiating a sexuality. i don't need anyone to substantiate any scientist politician to substantiat
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 12:45pm EDT
democracy in the middle east. he said that when he was talking about iraq but he meant it and we didn't really listen to. reducing his statements or the perception we have of him, for getting he is representing a system. he is representing an administration. this administration pushing for many reasons and not only political reasons anything which has to do today with the democratization in the region. the bloggers and cyberdissidents who were pushing and spreading around of feeling that something should change in egypt and tunisia and even syria or yemen many of these blockers -- this was known. google, freedom house, they were training people and financing the training of people who were advocating democracy and liberating the countries and they were trained by american organizations and european organizations and if we study what happened in eastern europe with the whole process of the european spring, eastern european spring because behind it was a philosophy no one had heard and not enough people heard about sasha pop povich who was getting a sense of how we mobilize the people in
CSPAN
Sep 14, 2012 12:00pm EDT
are shaping the future of syria they are not arabs. if we look at iraq they are trying to shape the future of iraq are not arabs with iran and turkey. weakness in the leadership in the world from states like egypt, syria, iraq have been marginalized for one reason or another the decision making process is very slow and we have the leadership there. they are following and think they will get involved like the affairs and the middle east. al jazeera is still trying to sort out its bloody civil war met in the 1990's, so we have a sense of malaise and weakness and vulnerability, marginalization. and here comes the islamists who are absolutely excellent at the marginalization on the part of the u.s. in particular. in his political and not religious because the islamists now, the extremists are trying to back up the frenzy of these alienated youth and other alienated. he is allowing this to take place to the criticism from the extreme islamists and allowing against the americans so they wouldn't focus on the injustices taking place and unemployment, problems with the minorities, egypt, se
CSPAN
Sep 5, 2012 5:00pm EDT
valuable books to come out of the iraq war. it's just out in paperback. have been recognized by the international association of culinary professionals and included in the best fooding series. welcome. [applause] to the left of her is amanda. cofounder of food 52.com and the author of the essential "new york times" cookbook are for which she won an award. a long time staffer for "the new york times" she has contributed to many books including "east memory" and "cooking for mr. latte." she left the "times" to pursue her website. >>>we have james who is the editor and chief of a magazine who was the judge on the first two seasons of "top chef masters." the 2006 book "cradles of flavor." was recognized by th association of culinary professionals and lectured widely. he was also an editor at an magazine. i 4r0*6 love "sassy." [laughter] and next to james is reverend dev any jackson. is a cofound the brooklyn rescue mission in 2002 with her husband to bring healthy food to the homeless. finding fresh food rare in do nax book. they began growing produce. it is now a small ere bon farm sup
CSPAN
Sep 25, 2012 6:00am EDT
supports the president. but also discuss the wars in iraq and afghanistan and u.s. relations with the middle east. from fordham university law school in new york, this is about an hour and a half. >> we are here again once again in connection with this conference dedicated to examining the 2012 presidential election, and the way it may be being shaped by the memory of the holocaust and the policy of israel. and we can find no to more interesting people to discuss this topic for many, many reasons. first, the former three term mayor of new york city, ed koch. [applause] people forget, i do not, but people forget that mayor koch act to start out in congress. so the discussion that watauga is not merely about his days as a member also he two, has run for congress and knows what that means. i think in this more recent vintage, mayor koch can be thought of as a kingmaker in guiding the jewish vote. many people, well, he may not agree to this but he may actually many people think of him as a barometer, kingmaker of sorts of whether jewish vote is headed. that's another reason to have them.
CSPAN
Sep 14, 2012 5:00pm EDT
took them by the print from the print of saudi arabia and from iraq between iraq and kuwait and sailed all the way to pakista from there we went to kandahar and torre borat. this is the first time when i met the american cia and my first support after i met them i said we are about to lose this war. the american people here are fighting for islam to live their life and death and they are not afraid to set this nation free they are setting from the event of tierney. they said i can to the united states of america for this purpose and when i can give to the united states they established as a position she ought. it was against israel and the usa our goal is to destroy them both. but i had a story of god of heaven and earth had a different story for me. [applause] when we can to the united states universities and colleges sending children where the playground we receive them and change them. we turn them against you. we met the professor and were helping the professors to establish purposely to change the world from within. we're changing the children to hate your nation with every
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